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Read or download our analysis, research and reports that shape conservation policy and help communities make the case for parks and open space.

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The North Olympic Peninsula is a vibrant place, with a rich history of cultural and traditional life, amazing wildlife corridors for eagles and elk, world class recreation, locally owned family farms, and traditional forestry jobs that inject life into local towns. Conserving farms, forests, trails, and parks ensures these communities are healthy and flourishing. This report analyzes the economic value of the conserved farms, forests, trails, and parks in the North Olympic Peninsula, which for the purposes of this report includes Jefferson, Clallam, and Kitsap Counties.

Public park and trail systems are a valuable component of healthy communities. The Trust for Public Land conducted a study of the Huron-Clinton Metroparks in Southeast Michigan and found that parks and trails generate over $90 million in economic benefits each year. They improve community health, reduce stormwater runoff, attract visitors, enhance property values, and boost economic development. To learn more about all these economics benefits, read the full report or fact sheet.

The Trust for Public Land and our partners have achieved amazing conservation funding heights for parks and open space, including the creation of more than $80 billion in public funds across the nation. But one program in Washington State has proven over time, that when you build bi-partisan support, and nurture relationships based on shared recreation and conservation values, you can create a lasting legacy.

The summer of 2020 is predicted to be the hottest ever recorded. Meanwhile, as the number of COVID-19 cases continues to surge nationwide, city officials are closing public beaches and pools and limiting the capacity of cooling centers. This is putting even more pressure on public parks, which were already in high demand as one of the few places where people can escape the confines of home.

As families count down to the first day of school, one thing is for certain: the 2020-2021 school year will be unlike any other in our collective lifetimes. The COVID-19 pandemic has put educators and school administrators between a rock and a hard place: bring kids back to the classroom, where experts say that all will be at high risk of virus transmission, or continue with distance learning, which experts agree compromises educational outcomes and accelerates inequality.

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