Research Library

Our analysis, research, tools, and reports shape conservation policy and help communities make the case for parks and open space.

229 articles meet the search criteria

Public park and trail systems are a valuable component of healthy communities. The Trust for Public Land conducted a study of the Huron-Clinton Metroparks in Southeast Michigan and found that parks and trails generate over $90 million in economic benefits each year. They improve community health, reduce stormwater runoff, attract visitors, enhance property values, and boost economic development. 

The Trust for Public Land and our partners have achieved amazing conservation funding heights for parks and open space, including the creation of more than $80 billion in public funds across the nation. But one program in Washington State has proven over time, that when you build bi-partisan support, and nurture relationships based on shared recreation and conservation values, you can create a lasting legacy.

The summer of 2020 is predicted to be the hottest ever recorded. Meanwhile, as the number of COVID-19 cases continues to surge nationwide, city officials are closing public beaches and pools and limiting the capacity of cooling centers. This is putting even more pressure on public parks, which were already in high demand as one of the few places where people can escape the confines of home.

The COVID-19 pandemic has underscored that close-to-home parks are crucial to a community’s quality of life. During this crisis, people have turned to their parks like never before—for fresh air, exercise, meditation, solace, and a much-needed break from the stresses of a quickly changing world.

For nearly half a century, the Trust for Public Land has pioneered a method of collaborating with communities to create parks that lead to greater health, resilience, and equity. Through it all, we have seen that the best parks center arts and culture in their design and that when done well, the process of creating a park can be as transformational for the neighborhood as the park itself.

Pages: