Historic sites

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Nidoto nai yoni. Let it not happen again.

That’s the idea that Clarence Moriwaki hopes visitors take away from the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial. “‘Let it not happen again’ is our message of aspiration and inspiration,”...

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This Earth Month, we’re highlighting people who are speaking up and fighting for equitable access to the outdoors—something that historian Alison Rose Jefferson knows a lot about. Her research, writing, and activism have focused on the ways Black people have fought...

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We’re proud to be part of the growing movement to preserve and lift up a more accurate, equitable public memory of America. That was the subject of our latest Park Bench Chat, a conversation with Keith Weaver, Trust for Public Land board member and executive vice...

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Judy Forte says there are many people who don’t know about the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. “We are taught certain facts in our classrooms, at home, and in our communities about Dr. King’s life,” she says. “But a lot of times people are just unaware of the details that make Dr...

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The National Register of Historic Places lists over 95,000 entries, from the famous (the Statue of Liberty) to the infamous (Alcatraz Prison in San Francisco Bay) to the downright strange (a six-story elephant statue outside of Atlantic City named Lucy). Despite the extraordinary range of places...

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On a warm afternoon in early fall, red-tailed hawks swooped low over fields of soybean on Firetown Road in Simsbury, Connecticut. Four abandoned barns, their weathered facades gleaming silver in the sun, stood by the roadside, vestiges of the Connecticut River Valley’s once-thriving tobacco...

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Nikki Gill has deep roots in Jackson Hole. When her great-grandparents homesteaded in this remote mountain valley in northern Wyoming in the early 1900s, the town of Jackson was little more than a tiny village carved out of rugged territory used seasonally by the Crow, Gros Ventre, Blackfeet,...

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The Hawaiian scholar Mary Kawena Pukūʻi wrote more than fifty books about the language and culture of Hawaiʻi. With titles like The Echo of Our Song: Chants and Poems of the Hawaiians, her scholarship helped spark the Hawaiian Renaissance of the 1970s. The movement celebrated Native...

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Residents of Stonington, Connecticut, fought a long campaign to conserve Coogan Farm—a peaceful, rural property on the banks of the Mystic River. Once the land was successfully protected in 2013,...

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Kolea Fukumitsu knows kalo. The starchy vegetable, also known as taro, is a traditional staple of Hawaiian diets, and Fukumitsu is in the ninth generation of his family who’ve cultivated it on the island of Oʻahu.

Fukumitsu grew up planting kalo at his...

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