Massachusetts

Northampton Community FarmPhoto credit: Jerry and Marcy Monkman

The Trust for Public Land is protecting the places that make Massachusetts a great place to live, work, and play. Whether building a city playground or creating a new urban farm, we're working to ensure the promise of livable communities for generations to come.

Local offices

10 Milk Street, Suite 810 | Boston, Massachusetts  02108
Phone: (617) 367-6200 | Email Address: massachusetts@tpl.org

Explore Our Work

 

Massachusetts projects

Highlighted Projects:

The Trust for Public Land protects Massachusetts' most significant farmland to sustain locally grown food, reconnect communities and reduce transportation from farm to plate for more nutritious and tastier food.

There are 2,600 vacant lots scattered throughout Boston-and they've got potential. The Trust for Public Land is working to transform unused, city-owned land into neighborhood farms that will create new job opportunities and provide residents with locally grown, nutritious produce.

When the Northfield Mount Hermon school closed its campus, residents were concerned that the forest might be sold and developed. In March 2014, The Trust for Public Land reached an agreement that keeps the property off the market while we help raise public and private funds to permanently protect it.

Projects (sorted alphabetically):

The heart of Boston's Museum of African American History is the African Meeting House, the oldest remaining black church structure in the United States.

With forests and a ridgetop view of Cape Cod Bay, the Biddle property
is as lovely and environmentally sensitive as it is historic. A homemade sign hung for years
in the Biddle family's kitchen. It read: "The environment, conservation and historic preservation BEGIN
HERE."

Buffalo Hill Farm, located fifteen miles south of Worcester, has a rich history.

We helped protect this 325-acre property is the centerpiece of the Mashpee National Wildlife Refuge on Waquoit Bay.

This farm has been an open landscape and active farm through a succession of different owners since the early 1600s. In recent years, however, the site's location near West Bridgewater's busy commercial area has made it the focus of several plans for commercial development.

TPL has helped protect approximately 290 acres in the Common Pasture in Newbury in a long-term effort to preserve this well-loved and iconic open space.

The Trust for Public Land protects Massachusetts' most significant farmland to sustain locally grown food, reconnect communities and reduce transportation from farm to plate for more nutritious and tastier food.

The 410-mile Connecticut River is New England's largest river, draining a 7.2 million-acre watershed that supports fisheries, farmlands, forests, and fresh water in four states: New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts and Connecticut.

Less than an hour from the bustle of downtown Boston, this forest hideaway provides a peaceful refuge for foxes, otters, songbirds—and people.

In 1998, TPL transferred the first 1/2-mile of an abandoned corridor to the city, along with a small adjacent parcel, to become part of the East Boston Greenway.

Located at the heart of Park Hill, 165-acre Echodale Farm was once the
largest unprotected working farm in Easthampton and vulnerable to
residential development.

TPL led an eleven-year effort to fund-raise for, design, and construct the new Elmhurst Street playground on a trash-strewn vacant lot in the park-poor Codman Square neighborhood in Boston's Dorchester section.

We helped arrange the purchase of 81 acres on Elmwood Farm as public open space, preserving Hopkinton's rural character and ensuring that the extensive hiking trails will always be open to the community.

TPL has conserved acres of river-front properties located on Moody Bridge Road near Hadley—including more than 4,000 feet of frontage on the Fort River—for addition to the Silvio O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge.

The Trust for Public Land is working with local partners and the community to transform this neglected property into a verdant working farm and center for urban agriculture.

There are 2,600 vacant lots scattered throughout Boston-and they've got potential. The Trust for Public Land is working to transform unused, city-owned land into neighborhood farms that will create new job opportunities and provide residents with locally grown, nutritious produce.

Established in 1943, Griggs Farm was the place to go in Billerica for spring tomato plants or fall pumpkins. But by the 1990s the farm had been hemmed in by retail malls as the town's character grew more suburban.

The 190-acre Hassanamesitt Woods property in Grafton is believed to contain the core remains of one of fourteen "praying Indian villages" in southern New England established to encourage Native Americans to convert to Christianity.

In New England, TPL has used its conservation expertise to protect many buildings, sites and landscapes important to the region's historic character.

In 1990 TPL helped the National Park Service acquire 3 acres to house the headquarters of the Lowell National Historical Park.

When new technology and economic cutbacks threatened to destroy the oldest continually operating boat building business in the United States in the early 1990s, TPL helped form the Lowell's Boat Shop Trust and transferred the shop to the Custom House Maritime Museum in Newburyport.

In April, 2009 The Trust for Public Land reached an agreement with the Raymond family to conserve Maplecroft Farm, 250 acres of land along scenic Route 133.

The Trust for Public Land preserves our coastal lands and waters, providing public access and ensuring the long-term health of our estuaries, beaches and bays that our tourism and fishing industries need to thrive.

This land near Pleasure Bay provides wildlife habitat, including more than 55 species of birds and protects Harwich's drinking water.

The Murray Farm is one of the last working farms in Bridgewater. The family ran a dairy farm here in the early 1900s-J.H. Murray was known as the "Midnight Milkman" for his late-night milk deliveries.

Preserving the North of Highland Camping Area in Truro, Massachusetts, was a priority for the late Senator Edward Kennedy, D-Mass, who led efforts to secure federal Land and Water Conservation Fund funding for the campground which allows public access to Cape Cod Seashore.

In 2010, The Trust for Public Land worked with the city of Northampton to conserve Bean and Allard Farms along the Mill River, to preserve local farming for the community, and expand recreational opportunities.

When the Northfield Mount Hermon school closed its campus, residents were concerned that the forest might be sold and developed. In March 2014, The Trust for Public Land reached an agreement that keeps the property off the market while we help raise public and private funds to permanently protect it.

Urban parks in Massachusetts provide people with opportunities for exercise, recreation, community building, and spiritual renewal in nature, just as they do nationwide.

From the 1800s until the early 20th century, the Plimpton family grew fruit and vegetables and raised livestock on their 320-acre farm. Plimpton Community Forest in Sturbridge became part of a 2,700-acre tract of connected open space and wildlife habitat, providing a new community resource for recreation, like hiking, mountain biking, dog walking, hunting, and fishing.

Established in 1942, Parker River National Wildlife Refuge consists of 4,662 acres on the southern two-thirds of Plum Island, a barrier island on Massachusetts' Northeast coast.

We helped Bolton residents and the local land trust preserve the adjoining Schartner and Nicewicz farms that had supplied the community and region for generations with a variety of fruits, flowers, and vegetables.

In 1986, TPL helped the Massachusetts Department of Agriculture purchase an Agricultural Preservation Restriction to permanently protect this 52-acre farm along the Connecticut River in the town of Montague.

In 2002, we partnered with the Department of Environmental Management protected one of the Town of Ipswich's key open space parcels.

We helped protect two acres to create Surf Park, a tranquil setting in which to enjoy scenic views of Kettle Cove in Gloucester and Manchester-by-the-Sea.

In 2006, TPL worked with the Town of Groton and the Groton Conservation Trust to assemble the funds required to purchase Surrenden Farm, the town's highest conservation priority.

In 2002, TPL helped the National Park Service and the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Management purchase a conservation and public access restriction over Thompson Island, as part of the Boston Harbor Islands National Park.

Nuestras Raíces, a grass-roots organization community development organization in Holyoke, Massachusetts worked with The Trust for Public Land to purchase four acres of farmland to offer urban farming, education and youth outreach opportunities, leadership building and river wildlife stewardship.

In 1995, we helped acquire an historic home at the edge of Walden Woods as a library and research center for the Thoreau Institute, which promotes the writer's work and legacy.

In 2009, the Windrush Farm Therapeutic Equitation and The Trust for Public Land announced the close of a successful campaign to help protect 195 acres where a unique riding program offers therapy for children and veterans with special needs.