Hawaii

Lumahai Beach Photo credit: noahhamiltonphoto.com

The people of Hawai‘i are bound together by aloha ‘āina—our love of the land. Our precious islands and their waters support us and inspire us, nurture us and feed us. They enshrine our history—and, if we care for them, will safeguard our future.

Since 1979, The Trust for Public Land and its donors have worked with local communities and public agencies to conserve the best of Hawai‘i. We’ve protected more land on O‘ahu, Hawai‘i Island, Maui, Kaua‘i, and Moloka‘i. We’ve helped to build national and state parks, and to conserve coasts, cultural landscapes, beaches, farms, and forests.

Local offices

1003 Bishop Street, Pauahi Tower, Suite 740 | Honolulu, Hawaii  96813
Phone: (808) 524-8560 | Email Address: hawaii@tpl.org

Explore Our Work

 

Hawaii projects

Highlighted Projects:

The Kona Coast on the island of Hawai'i is the site of the historic battle that led to the end of the traditional kapu religious system in the early 1800s. The Trust for Public Land worked with a local nonprofit organization, the landowner, and the community to preserve this special place for generations to come.

The Trust for Public Land is working with partners to protect the land from development and ensure that the area's natural beauty and cultural sites will be preserved for everyone to enjoy.

Stretching five miles from Kawela Bay to Kahuku Point, the land surrounding the Turtle Bay Resort embraces one of the last undeveloped wild shorelines on O'ahu.

Projects (sorted alphabetically):

In the state of Hawaii, TPL is working to conserve iconic shoreline vistas and involve committed local communities with deep connections to the land.

Preserving Hawaii's working agricultural and forest lands for food and energy production.

The Trust for Public Land is working with its partners to purchase and protect this former pineapple plantation for use by local farmers on O'ahu.

We are working to purchase this taro farm on O'ahu and transfer it to Ka Huli O Haloa, a local nonprofit supporting Hawaiian cultural traditions and education.

The remote northern end of the island of Moloka'i offers a modern view of an ancient culture. Local residents began restoring lo'i (terraces) and 'auwai (canals) in 1997, and reintroduced taro to Halawa Valley, which had been grown by the very same system for several hundred years up until the middle of this century.

Protecting cultural sites and landscapes important to Hawaiian communities.

Shoppers at the Costco store in the town of Hawai‘i Kai in East Honolulu might be surprised to learn that there's an environmental and cultural treasure nearby. The Hāwea heiau complex reflects the land’s cultural history in its ancient walls and petroglyphs, and agricultural terraces.

The Preserve is a lowland diverse forest on the eastern slope of the Wai'anae Mountain Range where 35 threatened and endangered species live, including 16 found nowhere else in the world.

Generations of local children have learned to fish and swim in the tidepools of Honu'apo, on the southern point of Hawa`i's Big Island. The bay is also used for community gatherings and by local fishermen who use traditional native Hawaiian throw-nets.

The Trust for Public Land is working with partners to protect the land from development and ensure that the area's natural beauty and cultural sites will be preserved for everyone to enjoy.

In December 2003, TPL helped Ka`ala Farm acquire this critical piece of property, ensuring permanent access and providing a land base for the farm's future growth.

Since 2010, the Maunalua Fishpond Heritage Center has been stewarding the spring and the archaeological and cultural sites on the property. The Trust for Public Land is now working with the center to permanently protect the site so they can continue to maintain the spring and offer educational opportunities.

Kauhola Point has been used as a gathering place since ancient times and is still used for camping, fishing, swimming, and surfing.

The undeveloped shoreline at Kawa on the island of Hawai'i protects nesting areas for the critically endangered Hawaiian hawksbill turtle.

Stretching five miles from Kawela Bay to Kahuku Point, the land surrounding the Turtle Bay Resort embraces one of the last undeveloped wild shorelines on O'ahu.

In May 2012, The Trust for Public Land helped protect 64 acres of coastal wetlands at Ka`ehu Bay, which includes numerous Hawaiian cultural sites including habitation structures, agricultural terraces, former fishponds, and shrines.

Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge has long been considered the best viewing site for Hawai`i's diverse seabird species.  In 1988, TPL helped preserve this critical habitat by 139 acres and transferring the land to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

The Kona Coast on the island of Hawai'i is the site of the historic battle that led to the end of the traditional kapu religious system in the early 1800s. The Trust for Public Land worked with a local nonprofit organization, the landowner, and the community to preserve this special place for generations to come.

In March 2011, TPL and the State Parks Division protectd 17 acres of privately-owned shoreline within the Lapakahi State Historical Park.

Located on Kaua`i's north shore, just past the community of Hanalei, Lumaha`i has long been the image of a Hawaiian paradise depicted in postcards, photographs, and movies.

Growing fresh produce, self-sufficiency, and young leaders at a community-run farm in Hawai'i.

One of the last truly open spaces in the urban Honolulu area, the 3,716-acre Moanalua valley narrowly escaped destruction as a potential corridor for the H-3 freeway, and was under threat of residential development for two decades.

Generations of residents of the Maui community of Hana have used gently
sloping Mu`olea Point to reach the ocean for fishing and swimming.
Dotted with ancient heiau (worship sites), the point is the setting for
numerous Hawaiian legends and contains the island's last grove of
Polynesian coconut palms.

The North Shore Greenprint identifies the resources most important to the North Shore and helps guide land conservation efforts.

Nearly a half-million visitors each year come to this park on Hawai'i Island to attend demonstrations of traditional Hawaiian arts and crafts, hike a historic trail to important archeological sites associated with the highest chiefs and priests, or just soak up the atmosphere of this sacred place.

Overlooking the world-class surf breaks at the Pipeline ('Ehukai) and Sunset Beach rises a 1,129-acre coastal bluff known as Pupukea-Paumalu.  In the 1990s, a community of more than 350 homes was approved for the bluff.

Sunset Ranch is a piece of the larger puzzle to "keep the country country" on the North Shore of O'ahu. This project is part of The Trust for Public Land's, the North Shore Community Land Trust's, and many other community members' broader efforts to keep the famed North Shore of O'ahu country through voluntary land conservation.

Forty-five minutes from Honolulu, a patchwork of small fields run from the Kamehameha Highway to the base of the mountains, where local farmers grow a bounty of delicious produce. 

In 2006, The Trust for Public Land helped the Office of Hawaiian Affairs reacquire the 1,875 acre valley, one of the last intact ahupua'a (traditional mountain to sea land division) on the island of O'ahu with special funding from the US Army.

The transfer of Wao Kele o Puna to the Office of Hawaiian Affairs marked the first time in over 100 years that lands ceded during the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy have been returned to Native Hawaiian ownership.