Georgia

Photo credit: Nick Arroyo

From the mountains, to the coast, to the banks of the Chattahoochee River, Georgia enchants us with a landscape rich in resources and steeped in history. As the leading nonprofit conserving land for people, The Trust for Public Land works to preserve the special places that connect Georgia residents to the past—and enrich our future with the promise of livable communities for generations to come.

Local offices

600 West Peachtree Street, NW, Suite 1840 | Atlanta, Georgia  30308
Phone: (404) 873-7306 | Email Address: georgia@tpl.org

Explore Our Work

 

Georgia projects

Highlighted Projects:

The Chattahoochee River is the primary resource for drinking water in metro Atlanta and is the state's largest recreation area, offering exceptional fishing, paddling, and hiking.

This 35-acre park is one of many projects TPL has completed for the BeltLine, a developing 22-mile corridor of parks, trails, and transit encircling downtown Atlanta.

On Georgia’s largest undeveloped barrier island, The Trust for Public Land has conserved more than 2,000 acres for the Cumberland Island National Seashore.

Projects (sorted alphabetically):

The Atlanta Beltline project—a 22 mile loop of historic railroad that circles downtown and midtown Atlanta—connects 45 diverse neighborhoods, including many of the city's most underserved by parks, and provides an extraordinary opportunity to link parks, trails, and transit to foster more livable communities.

TPL preserved a 10-acre property at the entrance of Bellwood Quarry, which will be a new 300-acre park along Atlanta's Beltline.

One of Georgia's premiere stopping spots for migratory ducks and other waterfowl, the refuge is also home to bald eagles, black bears, and alligators. And as a planned link in Macon's Ocmulgee Heritage Greenway, the refuge will increasingly welcome human visitors.

Boulevard Crossing Park was the first fully assembled new park along the Atlanta BeltLine.

The Chattahoochee River is the primary resource for drinking water in metro Atlanta and is the state's largest recreation area, offering exceptional fishing, paddling, and hiking.

The Trust for Public Land is working with cities along the Chattahoochee River to create a paddling trail along a 52-mile stretch that will help establish the area as  destination for recreation and ecotourism.

The Trust for Public Land worked with local advocacy groups to bring new life to this four-acre park by finding ways to fund an improved design.

On Georgia’s largest undeveloped barrier island, The Trust for Public Land has conserved more than 2,000 acres for the Cumberland Island National Seashore.

Enota Park will connect the Westview neighborhood to the Atlanta BeltLine.

Fort King George is a window into Georgia's past, cherished by the local community and historic preservation enthusiasts nationwide.

Hardman family members approached The Georgia Trust and The Trust for Public Land with the proposal to donate the property so that it could be conserved and protected from the development.

This 35-acre park is one of many projects TPL has completed for the BeltLine, a developing 22-mile corridor of parks, trails, and transit encircling downtown Atlanta.

The Hyde family bought this farm on the Chattahoochee River in the 1920s, and J.C. Hyde, the last of the family, farmed it until he was in his 90s, plowing by hand with the assistance of his stalwart mule, Nell, even as the land around the farm was consumed by urban sprawl.

This park was the site of a series of engagements known as the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain and the Battle of Kolb's Farm, and was named one of "America's Most Endangered Civil War Battlefields" by the Civil War Preservation Trust.

The Trust for Public Land assembled 6 key properties totaling 485 acres for this heavily used park in Gwinnett County.

Peggy Miles wanted to make sure that her beloved home and surrounding acres of forest known as "Lost Corner" would be protected for the public to enjoy.

In 2005, The Trust for Public Land protected five acres along Tanyard Creek as a new park named for Louise Howard, the longtime owner of the property.

TPL helped purchase more than a dozen properties for the park, including a former factory that was demolished to make way for a much-needed new parking lot.

This 485-acre property buffers 1.4 miles of the Chattahoochee River and served for more than a century as the "gateway" to Carroll County.

TPL preserved over 8 acres in the Murphy Crossing area for the Atlanta Beltline project.

In May, 1864, Confederate troops under General Joseph E. Johnson dug fortifications into rolling hills in Resaca, Georgia, attempting to stall the Union Major General William T. Sherman's advance on Atlanta. More than 150,000 soldiers fought for two days; thousands were killed or wounded, and the battle ended with the Confederate soldiers in retreat.

Farmed for nearly 300 years by the Rogers family, this leafy, peaceful site was slated for a 32-home development when The Trust for Public Land stepped up to conserve it

In 1994, a rural landowner in rapidly developing Forsyth County came to
TPL with a vision to protect the Sawnee Mountain ridgeline as one of the
largest open spaces in Metropolitan Atlanta.

The Trust for Public Land conserved 805 acres along the Snake Creek Gorge, a scenic, ecologically and geologically unique resource.

Though only 30 miles long, the Soque River is a vital tributary to the Chattahoochee River, a source of drinking water for millions of people downstream.