Hunger Mountain Headwaters

The Worcester Range is Vermont’s last undeveloped mountain range; the conservation of Hunger Mountain Headwaters will safeguard that sense of remoteness and wildness while also protecting significant wildlife habitat. The Worcester Range is Vermont’s last undeveloped mountain range; the conservation of Hunger Mountain Headwaters will safeguard that sense of remoteness and wildness while also protecting significant wildlife habitat. Photo credit: Kurt Budliger

Hunger Mountain and White Rock Mountain are two of Vermont’s most popular day hikes, cherished by visitors and residents alike. At the summits, hikers are treated to breathtaking views of the White Mountains to the east, the Adirondacks to the west, and almost every peak in the northern Green Mountain Range. But the remote experience along these trails was threatened when more than 1,800-acres of land along the approach to the summits was at risk of being sold and developed – that's when The Trust for Public Land stepped in.

By partnering with Stowe Land Trust, the State of Vermont, and generous donors, we were able to permanently protect this land in Stowe, Middlesex and Worcester. It will now be a part of C.C. Putnam State Forest, securing critical wildlife habitat, protecting the Winooski River Watershed, and ensuring the remote character of the state’s most popular hiking destinations. The land will continue to provide vital habitat for wildlife, including moose, bear, brook trout, bobcat, and Bicknell’s thrush—a species of global conservation concern. With an expansive forest of maple, birch, and spruce and 17-acres of prime wetlands, the Hunger Mountain Headwaters are emblematic of Vermont’s great outdoors.

 

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Since 1972, The Trust for Public Land has protected more than 3.3 million acres and completed more than 5,400 park and conservation projects.