Trails

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In the deep midwinter—the cold, dark stretch between the holidays and Groundhog Day—options for outdoor activity can feel limited. But there are special places The Trust for Public Land has protected from coast to coast that offer plenty of ways to while away a winter weekend in the great...

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For the past two decades, we've pioneered a movement that not only saves precious forestlands but also generates social and economic benefits. And we do it by putting communities at the center, championing local ownership and increasing access.

During the colonial era, forests that were...

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Few sights dazzle the eye like a stunning display of autumn foliage, and fall is in full swing at Trust for Public Land–protected places around the country.

We’re celebrating the season by sharing some favorite spots in all their red, gold, and orange glory. If you wish you could be road-...

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The Appalachian Trail is a solid contender for the title of America’s most famous footpath. The 2,190-mile route passes through 14 states and welcomes more than 2 million people each year, though just a few thousand will complete the arduous, six-month “thru hike” from Georgia to Maine.

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As Highway 1 crosses the Santa Ana River into the city of Newport Beach, California, it passes an unexpected open space. Buildings and roads briefly give way to a stretch of scrubby dunes lined with a chain-link fence. Beyond, sandstone outcroppings are studded with massive prickly pear cacti,...

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If you’ve taken a hike anywhere within an hour’s drive of Seattle, chances are, you have Jim Ellis to thank for it. A legendary civic leader who passed away in 2019 at age 98, Ellis was the force behind an extraordinary range of public projects throughout the Puget Sound region. As a young...

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Picture, if you will, a maple sugar harvest. It’s a storybook scene: a snowy New England forest, a bucket hanging on every tree catching a steady drip of sap, and a big vat simmering sweetly over a wood fire in a tumbledown barn, slowly reducing the sap into rich, amber syrup.

“Nope—mine...

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The Hawaiian scholar Mary Kawena Pukūʻi wrote more than fifty books about the language and culture of Hawaiʻi. With titles like The Echo of Our Song: Chants and Poems of the Hawaiians, her scholarship helped spark the Hawaiian Renaissance of the 1970s. The movement celebrated Native...

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Well, there’s no two ways about it: 2020 has been a doozy. But through the uncertainty, change, and heartbreak of the past year, Americans have rallied around the power of parks to help communities endure challenges, and emerge stronger on the other side.

As we look back on all we’ve...

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We’re proud to partner with the Campbell Soup Foundation to create parks for people in Camden, New Jersey. ...

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