National Parks

Hanning Flat

Located where three ecological regions – the Sierra Nevada, Great Basin and Mojave – come together, is the 3,806-acre Hanning Flat property, a property critical for connectivity between the desert and the Sierra Nevada. This rural property was identified for preservation due to its adjacency to four publicly-accessible state and federal conservation preserves, its significant wildlife corridors essential for climate change resiliency, and as a potential burrowing owl re-establishment site due to the gradual sloping grasslands found at the lower elevations.  

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UPDATE: Great news! We're proud to announce we've protected 17 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail at Trinity Divide in Northern California, closing one of the largest gaps in public ownership along the entire trail....

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Public lands advocates like you helped score a big victory for parks and open space this spring, when the President signed a bill to permanently reauthorize the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF). But that bill didn’t guarantee funding for this...

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When Seth Zaharias learned that the federal government’s partial shutdown would affect services at Joshua Tree National Park, he knew just what he needed to do. “On day one, I drove straight to Walmart and bought a hundred dollars’ worth of toilet paper,” he says. “Then I started making calls...

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In the early 1860s, a handful of Mormon pioneers in Utah settled near the mouth of a deep, dark canyon carved by the Virgin River. The Paiute people who’d inhabited the area for generations called the canyon Mukuntuweap, which may have meant “straight canyon,” given its sheer walls. The Mormon...

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The Perseid meteor shower in mid-August is among the most anticipated astronomical events of the year. During its peak, skywatchers can expect to see 50 or more shooting stars per hour.

Of course, how much of that display you can actually see depends on where you are. For the best chance...

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What do you see when you look at a desert? An empty space? A forbidding wasteland? For some, the sun is too bright, the air too dry, and the cactus too thorny. Others might find the desert a nice place to visit, but no place to live.

But for some people—desert people—the space and the...

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Public lands need your help now more than ever. With your help, The Trust for Public Land has saved over 3.6 million acres of public land, and completed more than 5,400 park and community projects across the county. But we are facing an uphill battle to preserve our iconic national monuments and...

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Martin Luther King Jr. was once just a kid—a bright, studious boy, but not too serious to chase his sisters around the backyard of the family home, a tidy Victorian at 501 Auburn Avenue in Atlanta. Before he became a leader of the civil rights movement, he shared a bedroom with his younger...

Press release

“This decision is a mistake. Undermining our national monument protections is an assault on our most treasured historic and natural wonders, and directly contradicts the wishes of the overwhelming majority of Americans who support our public lands. The President’s executive action to reduce the boundaries of Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments is not just a Utah issue—it puts all national monuments at risk. The priceless historic, cultural, and natural wonders of our national monuments are exactly the places and values which should be permanently protected, as Congress envisioned when it passed the Antiquities Act.”

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