Conservation Finance

The Green Mountains are the backbone of more than 2 million acres of wildlife habitat, forests, and trails—including the Long Trail, the nation’s oldest long-distance hiking route; the Appalachian Trail, a National Scenic Trail; and the Catamount Trail, a... Read more

Owned for many years by the Stanley Tool Company, this land once supplied timber for the manufacture of handles for hammers, axes, and other hand tools.

With funding from the federal Land and Water Conservation Fund, TPL preserved nearly 4,000 acres of valuable habitat within the Ouachita National Forest. TPL worked with nonprofit partners to build grassroots support for the acquisition.

In 1995, TPL helped the city of Montpelier acquire 152 acres as an addition to the city's North Branch Recreation area, which includes a network of trails, parks, and open lands.

Located in central Louisiana, the Kisatchie National Forest is a sportsperson's paradise, with an estimated 706,262 annual visitors. Within the forest lies the Nantachie-Saline Restoration Area, a 20,000-acre privately owned inholding that The Trust for... Read more

In the 1940s, tens of thousands of acres of forest in Louisiana's Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley were clear cut and converted to cotton and other crops.

Our partnership with the City of Burlington began in 1991, when we helped the city purchase 45 acres of land on Lake Champlain from the Central Vermont Railway.

Coastal Beaufort County is South Carolina's fastest-growing county and home to Hilton Head Island, a popular resort and retirement community. In 2000, voters passed, with TPL's help, a $40 million bond referendum to protect natural areas, historic sites,... Read more

The 410-mile Connecticut River is New England's largest river, draining a 7.2 million-acre watershed that supports fisheries, farmlands, forests, and fresh water in four states: New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, and Connecticut.

Louisiana has lost 1.3 million acres of coastal wetlands in the past 80 years, and continues to lose 10,000 acres per year.

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