Androscoggin Headwaters

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Androscoggin Headwaters, New Hampshire
Photo credit: 
Jerry and Marcy Monkman

Covering 31,300 acres of remote forests, streams, and ponds, the Androscoggin Headwaters near Umbagog National Wildlife Refuge is one of the largest unprotected properties remaining in the state of New Hampshire. Rich with assets that draw outdoors enthusiasts, the area also appeals to those seeking second homes, making the land highly vulnerable to development. Featuring nationally significant wildlife and fisheries resources, the property is also important for the region’s timber economy. The Trust for Public Land is working with the landowner (Plum Creek Timber Company), New Hampshire Fish and Game, the New Hampshire Forest Legacy Program, and the Umbagog National Wildlife Refuge in a multi-phase effort to bring the most critical wildlife habitat into public ownership while placing the balance of the property under a conservation easement.

The jewels of the Androscoggin Headwaters property are Greenough Pond and Little Greenough Pond, two of only three ponds in New Hampshire that sustain native, non-stocked brook trout populations. Development around these two ponds would degrade some of the best cold-water fisheries in the eastern United States. These ponds were protected in March 2013 when we acquired the property and subsequently transferred ownership to New Hampshire Department of Fish and Game.

The Trust for Public Land and partners are seeking funding from federal, state and private sources. To date, we have succeeded in adding approximately 7,500 acres to the Umbagog National Wildlife Refuge and have conveyed 934 acres to New Hampshire Department of Fish and Game for fisheries conservation. Work is underway to protect the remaining 23,000 acres of productive forestland under a state-held conservation easement.

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Since 1972, The Trust for Public Land has protected more than 3 million acres and completed more than 5,200 park and conservation projects. You’ll find some of our favorite places on the map below.