Lost Corner Preserve in Sandy Springs now Complete

August 22, 2012

Two more acres will be added to the Lost Corner Preserve today, completing long-standing plans to forever protect the forested land in the city of Sandy Springs.

The action by the Sandy Springs City Council means the city will buy the land from The Trust for Public Land, a national conservation organization which has been working to protect land throughout Georgia for more than 25 years.

The Lost Corner Preserve was created from land owned by Margaret (Peggy) L. Miles, who lived her entire life on the property, which had been purchased by her parents in the early 1900s. It was her wish that the forested property be protected for the public. The land has a large number of old trees since neither Mrs. Miles nor her parents ever logged the property.

Four years ago, 22 acres of the property were used to create the Lost Corner Preserve. Ms. Miles died in 2008, and The Trust for Public Land acquired the last two acres from her estate.

“Today’s action fulfills the wishes of Peggy Miles that this land be protected and enjoyed by the people of Sandy Springs and the State of Georgia, just as she enjoyed it her entire life,” said Curt Soper, Georgia Director of The Trust for Public Land. “She gave a wonderful, living gift to this community and the people who live here will long appreciate her foresight and generosity.”

The Lost Corner Preserve is owned and managed by the City of Sandy Springs.

"The creation of this park is an example of what is possible when residents come together with city leadership and work towards a common goal. In honoring Ms. Miles’ wishes, we all benefit with a lovely park in which to walk, rest and learn more about nature," said Sandy Springs Mayor Eva Galambos.

The Sandy Springs Conservancy, a local conservation group, partnered with The Trust for Public Land to create the preserve.

“We are deeply pleased that the two acres are now part of Lost Corner Nature Preserve, completing the original homestead which Ms. Miles wanted preserved for us and generations to come,” said Steve Levetan, Chair of The Sandy Springs Conservancy.

The Trust for Public Land protects land for people to enjoy as parks, playgrounds and open space and is the nation’s leading organization for building parks in cities across the country. Since it was founded in 1972, it has completed more than 5,200 conservation projects in 47 states.