Conservation economics

Scaling a wall face at Torode Pit, Jacobs Mountain

The Trust for Public Land conducted an economic analysis of the return on Alabama’s investment in land conservation through the Alabama Forever Wild Land Trust Program. As detailed in this report, we found that every public $1 invested in land conservation returned $5 in natural goods and...

Mountain biking in the Colorado winter

The public park and recreation system in Colorado Springs provides substantial economic benefits to the community’s residents. Colorado Springs’ parks, trails, open spaces, and facilities are enjoyed by residents and visitors alike. These amenities are a fundamental component of the community...

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From the standoff at Malheur Wildlife Refuge to the debate over Bears Ears National Monument, conflicts over use of public lands often raise questions about the role these places play in the economy. It’s not only industries like...

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Update—November 9, 2016: Americans voted overwhelmingly in support of parks this Election Day. Of the 86 park, conservation, and restoration measures that appeared on ballots across the country, 68 passed. That means that in one day, voters like you created $6.3 billion for land...

The Trust for Public Land’s report Connecting and Strengthening Communities: The Economic Benefits of Great Rivers Greenway demonstrates the success of the network of greenways in generating social and economic benefits.

The report includes three analyses that provide a benchmark...

Press release

A new report by the Trust for Public Land shows that the San José's park system of regional and neighborhood parks, trails, and community facilities generates millions of dollars in economic benefits.

San José, northern California’s largest city and home to many of Silicon Valley’s largest employers, has a large natural and developed park system that provides beauty, recreational opportunities, access to nature, and positive environmental impacts to residents, workers, and tourists alike.

The Johnson County Park & Recreation District (JCPRD) was established in 1955 and is the only special park district in Kansas. By providing park areas and access to an array of outdoor activities, JCPRD generates numerous economic benefits within the local community.

From San Francisco's first public park, Portsmouth Square, to the unparalleled experience of Golden Gate Park, the city's vast legacy of diverse parks has great economic value: an impressive $959 million a year.

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