Good news

Heat Response
Everyone deserves access to a quality park and the vital benefits parks provide. But today, 100 million people in this country—a third of us!—don’t have a park within a 10-minute walk of home. Closing park access gaps will require us to get the most use of the public and open spaces we already have, in places like forgotten alleyways, post-industrial waterfronts, and asphalt-covered schoolyards. America’s more than 100,000 public schools are logical sites to spark community transformation and increase access to high-quality green space. 

 

Blog

Brianne Parker still remembers the conversation that sparked the outdoor education movement in Huntington, Vermont. It was five years ago and a parent at Brewster-Pierce Memorial School told Brianne, a kindergarten teacher there, about a public radio segment that extolled the benefits of getting...

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Nikki Gill has deep roots in Jackson Hole. When her great-grandparents homesteaded in this remote mountain valley in northern Wyoming in the early 1900s, the town of Jackson was little more than a tiny village carved out of rugged territory used seasonally by the Crow, Gros Ventre, Blackfeet,...

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Everybody needs a place to call home, where we feel like we belong and are welcome. But today, too many of our neighbors experience exclusion, isolation, harassment, and even violence on the basis of their identity. 

When we welcome and include everyone who calls America home, we bring...

Blog

Well, there’s no two ways about it: 2020 has been a doozy. But through the uncertainty, change, and heartbreak of the past year, Americans have rallied around the power of parks to help communities endure challenges, and emerge stronger on the other side.

As we look back on all we’ve...

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Through this tumultuous year, I’ve been making a practice to count my blessings. And the parks and trails here in the San Francisco Bay Area are near the top of my list. Since the start of the pandemic, spending time outdoors has become an even more important part of how we all stay...

Zion National Park

Zion National Park encompasses close to 150,000 acres of wild canyon country. What many visitors don't realize is that parts of this wild, beloved national park are at risk of development: nearly 3,000 acres of private land remain within Zion's boundaries. These islands of private property can impact trail access, wildfire management, views, water quality, and wildlife habitat — not to mention interrupting your hike. 

Heat Response

Across Philadelphia, extreme heat disproportionately impacts lower-income and vulnerable communities, an inequity that influences their health, safety, and daily lives. The Trust for Public Land’s Heat Response project engages community members in Fairhill, Grays Ferry and Southeast Philadelphia to create public art that addresses the question: “Why should we care about urban heat and what can we do about it?” A team of four local artists, supported by nationally renowned artist Eve Mosher, and neighborhood leads, will help elevate community voices and creatively amplify their lived experiences to drive policy change and achieve equity across Philadelphia neighborhoods in response to rising temperatures.  

Wenatchee

The Trust for Public Land and our partners have achieved amazing conservation funding heights for parks and open space, including the creation of more than $80 billion in public funds across the nation. But one program in Washington State has proven over time, that when you build bi-partisan support, and nurture relationships based on shared recreation and conservation values, you can create a lasting legacy.

Blog

For years, students at Dallas’s South Oak Cliff High School went to class in grim conditions. “The roof leaked, asbestos was everywhere, drinking water came in lead pipes, the heating and air conditioning didn’t work,” says Derrick Battie, head of the South Oak Cliff alumni association. “Our...

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