Waimea Valley

Waimea Valley, O'ahu ‘Olapa (hula dancers) at the 2006 blessing and celebration of Waimea Valley’s protection. Photo credit: Suzanne Westerly

In ancient times, Waimea Valley belonged to the kahuna (priestly class of Hawaiians). Waimea is one of the last intact ahupua'a (traditional mountain to sea land division) on the island of O'ahu, and contains a spectacular waterfall, the recently restored the Hale o Lono heiau (an agricultural temple), an extensive botanical garden that includes hundreds of rare and endangered plants, and numerous Hawaiian cultural sites of great significance.

In 2006, The Trust for Public Land helped return 1,875 acres of the valley to Native Hawaiian ownership through the Office of Hawaiian Affairs. In 2007, the Office of Hawaiian Affairs conveyed ownership to its nonprofit Hi'ipaka, LLC which stewards the valley’s natural and cultural resources and shares Waimea with residents, Hawaiian cultural practitioners, and visitors.

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Since 1972, The Trust for Public Land has protected more than 3.3 million acres and completed more than 5,400 park and conservation projects.