Coastal and Shoreline Lands

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Mu'olea Point, Hana, Maui, HI.
Photo credit: 
Arna Johnson

With over 1,000 miles of tidal shoreline, Hawai'i boasts white and black sand beaches, bays, fishponds, sand dunes, estuaries, wetlands, coral reefs, rocky coastlines, and reknowned surfing spots. Historically, the Hawaiian Islands have suffered catastrophic loss of land and access to shorelines and the cultural and natural resources they provide; sadly, these losses continue.

While the public owns Hawai'i's shorelines up to the vegetation line or upper wash of the waves, development has limited free access to these scenic and productive landscapes. Our work along Hawaiian coastlines, then focuses on protecting areas that facilitate public access to the shoreline where families surf, swim, fish, play, and reaffirm their identity through traditional cultural practices.

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Explore our work

Since 1972, The Trust for Public Land has protected more than 3 million acres and completed more than 5,200 park and conservation projects. You’ll find some of our favorite places on the map below.