Ke Alahula

Ke Alahula - a familiar or well-worn pathPhoto credit: TPL archive

Imagine a 30-plus-mile multiuse path along O‘ahu’s South Shore connecting Waikiki to West O‘ahu that would provide some 600,000 residents with easy access to the island's shorelines and green spaces; a path where hikers, bikers, walkers, and runners could exercise and connect with nature in and around Oʻahu’s urban coastal neighborhoods.

The Statewide Comprehensive Recreation Plan (SCORP 2015) surveyed thousands of recreational enthusiasts who identified  walking, hiking, and biking facilities as top priorities, and would like multiuse paths to allow for safe and easy connections between neighborhoods and to Honolulu’s parks, beaches, and attractions. A Current Conditions Study has shed light on the fact that the concept of Ke Alahula – a familiar or well-used path – along the waterfront from Waikiki to West Oahu has lingered for almost a century.

The Trust for Public Land, together with Blue Planet Foundation, Hawaii Bicycling League, the Hawaii Community Development Authority, the City and County of Honolulu, and National Park Service trail planning staff, are working to explore strategies that would make this century long community dream a reality.

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Since 1972, The Trust for Public Land has protected more than 3.3 million acres and completed more than 5,400 park and conservation projects.