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Format: 2015-07-05
Format: 2015-07-05
Press release
San Francisco |
May 19, 2015

In a historic finish, the cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul tied for first place on The Trust for Public Land's 4th annual ParkScore® index, with each city earning a perfect 5 "park bench" rating from the nonprofit organization.

In the news
May 19, 2015

Ninety-six percent of people in St. Paul, Minn., live within a 10-minute walk of a park. This ease of access is one reason why St. Paul -- along with sister city Minneapolis -- took the top spot in the Trust for Public Land's most recent ranking of urban park systems.

In the news
May 19, 2015

Ninety-seven percent of D.C. residents live within a half-mile of a park. That ease of accessibility and the quality of the city’s parks earned the District the third spot on a list of the best cities for parks in the country, according to an annual ranking released Wednesday by the Trust for Public Land.

In the news
May 19, 2015

Many residents of Minneapolis will tell you that the vast park system is the crown jewel of the city. Well, the folks at The Trust for Public Land will back that up. The nonprofit organization's 3rd annual ParkScore® index gave Minneapolis a perfect "5-park bench" rating, naming the Mini-Apple's park system as the country's best for the second straight year

In the news
May 19, 2015

For the third straight year, Minneapolis has been judged to have the best city parks in the country. But this year, it’s sharing that distinction with a familiar rival: St. Paul.

In the news
May 19, 2015

Pisgah National Forest, which covers more than a half-million acres of heavily forested mountains, mile-high peaks, waterfalls, streams and rivers along the eastern edge of the mountains of Western North Carolina, just added another 517 acres of important conservation land thanks to federal money from the Land and Water Conservation Fund.

In the news
Rego Park, Queens |
May 18, 2015

As an example of the many ways in which the proposed QueensWay Park plans to highlight local businesses and the cultural diversity of the borough, The Trust for Public Land and Friends of the QueensWay today announced a new community initiative called QueensWay Eats. QueensWay Eats—a local restaurant guide and online interactive companion guide—showcases the great diversity of the borough through the many eateries located near the proposed 3.5-mile linear park. The release of the guide was held at famed Rego Park deli Ben's Best Delicatessen, and supported by the Queens Tourism Council.

In the news
May 18, 2015

On a cold February morning in West Windsor, Vermont, the scene at the base of Ascutney Mountain Resort is particularly chilling. For nearly five years, the lifts haven’t spun and the trails have grown into a mangled mess of maple, poplar and birch seedlings. The depressing scene can’t diminish the drive of a few spirited skiers, however ... They’re working to purchase and conserve the land on which Ascutney Mountain Resort once operated and, together with local nonprofits and the townspeople of West Windsor, reopen Ascutney as a community ski hill with hike-to terrain and summertime mountain bike trails.

Press release
San Diego |
May 17, 2015

Today The Trust for Public Land and Cox Communications announced the finalists for California's Cox Conserves Heroes 2015 awards. The public is invited to vote for the winner now through May 31 at CoxConservesHeroes.com. A total of $20,000 will be donated to local environmental nonprofits on behalf of the three finalists, who were selected to represent Orange County, San Diego and Santa Barbara and compete for the overall recognition as California's Cox Conserves Hero.

In the news
May 17, 2015

A Queens deli is making a meal of the proposed QueensWay, which would transform 3.5 miles of abandoned railroad tracks into the borough's version of the High Line.

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