Water

After four years of funding delays, two conservation groups announced Friday they have purchased an 8,159-acre parcel that will provide the public with access to the Cold Stream forest in western Maine. The purchase also will protect valuable deer wintering and brook trout habitat.

The Trust for Public Land and Trout Unlimited today announced the purchase of the Cold Stream forest, a 8,159-acre property near the The Forks which will provide public access and protect habitat for deer and wild brook trout, including more than 3,000 acres of deer wintering area and seven wild brook trout ponds. 

New Jersey’s Pine Barrens are an oasis for wildlife, plants … and people seeking some peace and quiet in the middle of America’s most densely-populated state.

There are corners of Montana where it can seem like time stands still. In the hush of a deep forest or the chatter of a trout stream, the imagination wanders back to an era in the West when the woods were wild and deals were sealed with a handshake.

The Trust for Public Land, Green Diamond Resource Company and Washington State Department of Natural Resources today announced they have permanently protected 6,967 acres of working forest land in Mason County at the southwestern end of Puget Sound.

The Trust for Public Land, City of Whitefish, F.H. Stoltze Land & Lumber, and Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks today announced that they have recorded a conservation easement on 3,020 acres owned by F.H. Stoltze Land & Lumber Company in the Haskill Creek watershed east of Whitefish. Closing this deal means that the land will be permanently protected to support local timber jobs and important fish and wildlife habitat, while also providing the City of Whitefish with the majority of their water supply and the public with continued opportunities for close-to-home outdoor recreation.

The Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area in suburban Atlanta is growing by 47 acres, which will nearly complete an eight-mile corridor of conserved public land along the river, The Trust for Public Land and the National Park Service announced today.

For much of the past century, wetlands were dismissed as useless or even dangerous—dredged, filled in, developed, and polluted. Since 1900, we’ve lost nearly two-thirds of the wetland in the contiguous United States.

The nonprofit Trust for Public Land will within days begin the process of reopening Astoria Hot Springs to the public as part of a 100-acre park.The natural hot springs are located 16 miles south of Jackson on the bank of the Snake River within property owned by New York-based real estate concern Northlight Trust.

The proposal to rebuild Astoria Hot Springs  has been widely supported in the community. A rezoning application recently approved by the Teton County commissioners paves the way for the historic springs to return, albeit in a different form.

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