Trails

Since 1961, the Applewood Golf Course in Golden, Colorado has provided community members and area golf enthusiasts with a picturesque course nestled against the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. In late 2016, The Trust for Public Land purchased the property, ensuring the protection of 146 acres of urban open space from residential development.

Set in the foothills of the Green Mountains and the fast-growing town of Williston, Vermont, the 383-acre Catamount Outdoor Family Center attracts more than 20,000 bikers, skiers, and hikers per year who take advantage of more than twenty miles of trails that meander through a diverse landscape of open meadows and forested ridges.

As it passes through the Berkshires in Western Massachusetts, The Appalachian Trail explores one of Southern New England’s last wild and remote landscapes. Here, Warner Hill receives both thru-hikers and day visitors, treating them to densely forested trails before giving way to a rocky, open landscape at its peak.

One evening, years ago, Dennis Hart’s mother told him that she wanted to go for a hike.

The Trust for Public Land announced today that it has received a $50,000 grant from Gulf Coast Community Foundation to help extend The Legacy Trail into downtown Sarasota.

The Trust for Public Land today announced that the 520-acre Peaceful Springs Preserve has been added to the Balcones Canyonlands National Wildlife Refuge, permanently protecting public recreation and birding opportunities, supporting underground aquifer resources, and providing critical habitat for endangered species and other wildlife.

Already home to nearly 200,000 residents, Medina County is one of the top ten fastest growing counties in the State of Ohio. While good news for the local economy, this growth is threatening the area’s remaining wild landscapes and cutting off public access to its vibrant natural resources.

On a cool, wet evening in early May, J.T. Horn found himself pacing outside of a high school gym in Northfield, Massachusetts. Behind the double doors, neighbors were gathered for the annual town meeting.

Imagine a 30-plus-mile multiuse path along O‘ahu’s South Shore connecting Waikiki to West O‘ahu that would provide some 600,000 residents with easy access to the island's shorelines and green spaces; a path where hikers, bikers, walkers, and runners could exercise and connect with nature in and around Oʻahu’s urban coastal neighborhoods.

To the delight of the local community, The Trust for Public Land and the Bureau of Land Management announced today that 2,576 acres has been acquired by the Bureau of Land Management within the Río Grande Del Norte National Monument.

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