Mayor Michael A. Nutter, Superintendent Dr. William Hite and The Trust for Public Land made two announcements today regarding the City's efforts to green schoolyards and recreation centers. Construction is nearly complete on a new schoolyard at William Dick Elementary School which will officially open to students and the community later this summer. Across the street from the school, construction is beginning at Hank Gathers Recreation Center.

Student Avery Anthony describes the schoolyard at William Cramp Elementary School in North Philadelphia like this: “Our site is plain ground. All we do is talk and run. It gets boring and there are no games.”

In Brooklyn, kids are celebrating the opening of three more brand-new, custom-built playgrounds—the latest of more than 150 created for New York City public schools with help from The Trust... Read more

The final funds needed to turn a barren asphalt schoolyard in Newark's Central Ward into a state-of-the-art green playground have been secured, The Trust for Public Land and Congregation Ahavas Sholom announced today.

Now that Labor Day has come and gone, many parents have their hands full in the morning as they juggle getting ready for work and getting the kids off to school. And while their kids' schools mostly look the same as last spring, there are major differences in some of their playgrounds, which are being designed for new purposes.

The Trust for Public Land will work with students and residents in the community to transform this playground in West Philadelphia  with new playground equipment, an improved recreation field, and stormwater management features.

The Trust for Public Land is working with various community groups to transform the aging recreation center at 37 th and Mt. Vernon streets in Philadelphia's Mantua neighborhood into a vibrant new park.

The Trust for Public Land will launch a community design process with neighbors and various community organizations to generate designs to revitalize Lanier Playground in the Grays Ferry section of South Philadelphia.

The people of Ventura's Westside neighborhood needed a park. But with little open space and a very limited budget, they waited years for the right opportunity.

The city of Nogales asked The Trust for Public Land to help build a 20-acre park in a park-poor area of the city on Western Avenue.