Playgrounds

As part of The Trust for Public Land's participatory design process, we worked with Taggart students to develop a new schoolyard that fosters learning and creativity, encourages exercise, and honors the diversity of the school's student body that collectively represents 27 different languages.

Classical Studies Magnet Academy invited The Trust for Public Land to help turn its asphalt schoolyard into a more inviting and inclusive play space.

Johnson Oak Park in Bridgeport's East End is one of the city's top priorities for park improvement. The park is adjacent to Tisdale Elementary School and is used by students and neighbors alike.

Dubbed "the Park City", Bridgeport, Connecticut, is looking to live up to its name. The mayor declared parks critical to "the future health of the city's ecosystem, economy, and community" and asked The Trust for Public Land to help put the plan into action.

Today The City of New York and The Trust for Public Land celebrated the completion of their sixth green infrastructure playground—the first to open in Queens—with a ribbon-cutting ceremony at J.H.S. 157 Halsey Jr. High School.

Green space is in short supply in Denver's Westwood neighborhood. In fact, Curatro Vientos—or Four Winds—is the first new park in the area in more than 30 years.

The Trust for Public Land is working with Portland Parks and Recreation to focus on densely populated areas that most need new parks—places like the Cully neighborhood, which has the city’s lowest number of parks per capital.

Built in 1868, Mestizo-Curtis Park is the oldest in Denver. Its nine acres of tree-lined paths hold great potential, but the park lacks the amenities it needs to serve as a quality gathering and play space for this dense and diverse neighborhood.

Mayor Michael A. Nutter, Superintendent Dr. William Hite and The Trust for Public Land made two announcements today regarding the City's efforts to green schoolyards and recreation centers. Construction is nearly complete on a new schoolyard at William Dick Elementary School which will officially open to students and the community later this summer. Across the street from the school, construction is beginning at Hank Gathers Recreation Center.

Student Avery Anthony describes the schoolyard at William Cramp Elementary School in North Philadelphia like this: “Our site is plain ground. All we do is talk and run. It gets boring and there are no games.”

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