Playgrounds

Through the identification of schoolyards within the city’s green infrastructure priority areas, targeting specific stormwater management goals, playgrounds like P.S. 261 can have an immediate impact on water quality within their local watersheds

For decades, an odd-shaped lot on King Boulevard in South Los Angeles sat vacant. Though fenced off from trespassers, trash collected inside its borders and the weeds grew brown and brittle.

The property is one of thousands of parcels landowners have abandoned or left vacant, some in the wake of the Watt riots of summer 1965, which community organizers now want to turn into play spaces for young children and their families.

A four-acre park and playground in Bridgeport’s East End is about to get a major makeover. Mayor Bill Finch announced Tuesday that the city will soon begin transforming Johnson Oak Park, as well as the grounds of the adjacent Jettie S. Tisdale Elementary School.

“There is poop going into the East River,” the teacher says, sprinkling black specks onto a cutaway model consisting of buildings, streets, and sewer pipes. It is week three of design class at P.S. 15, the Roberto Clemente School, on Manhattan’s Lower East Side, and a group of third graders is participating in the New York City Playgrounds Program, which, led by the Trust for Public Land (TPL), transforms asphalt inner-city schoolyards into community parks.

The Trust for Public Land is now leading the transformation of the current asphalt schoolyard into a stimulating green play space that will combine interactive learning with environmental sustainability.

The The Trust for Public Land is helping transform this asphalt schoolyard into a vibrant play space that will also mitigate storm runoff.

As part of The Trust for Public Land's participatory design process, we worked with Taggart students to develop a new schoolyard that fosters learning and creativity, encourages exercise, and honors the diversity of the school's student body that collectively represents 27 different languages.

In Los Angeles last weekend, a neighborhood street echoed with the sound of soaring swing-sets, clattering skateboards, and the buoyant brass of a Mariachi band.

Classical Studies Magnet Academy invited The Trust for Public Land to help turn its asphalt schoolyard into a more inviting and inclusive play space.

Johnson Oak Park in Bridgeport's East End is one of the city's top priorities for park improvement. The park is adjacent to Tisdale Elementary School and is used by students and neighbors alike.

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