Playgrounds

A Bronx playground is back in business after a million dollar makeover that gives new meaning to the term "green space." NY1's Roger Clark filed this report.

After months of planning, design and construction, the new playground was almost ready. Arianna Cruz, 11, planted phlox, lavender and salvia in the garden. Lance Barbosa, 10, spritzed the plants — and an occasional classmate — with a garden hose.

The Trust for Public Land and New York City today unveiled a state-of-the art-playground on a formerly cracked asphalt lot at The School of Science and Applied Learning, CS 300 in the Bronx's Tremont neighborhood.

The community of Maywood in southeast Los Angeles is the most densely populated city west of the Mississippi River. Homes are built very close together and kids have little room to play. But the landscape is changing as one of three vacant lots was recently transformed into a pocket park.

An asphalt court behind P.S. 111 on West 53rd Street has gone green thanks to a student-designed nearly $1.3 million renovation. The schoolyard now has a turf field, track, outdoor ping-pong tables, forest walk, rain garden, outdoor classroom, gazebo, and chess and checker tables. Students consulted with the playground designers for more than three months to create the plan.

The Trust for Public Land and New York City today unveiled a state-of-the art-playground on a formerly cracked asphalt lot at P.S. 111 in Manhattan's Hell's Kitchen neighborhood. Designed with help from the school's students and built in partnership with New York City, the one-acre playground will include green infrastructure components that will allow the space to capture up to 700,000 gallons of stormwater runoff each year.

Philadelphia is on a mission to convert its dilapidated open spaces into green, safe havens one park rehabilitation project at a time.

For community stakeholders interested in transforming vacant lots, it may seem easier to clean up blighted areas than to change public opinion about the area of South Los Angeles widely known for its infamous riots. Yet, several community-based organizations are determined to do both.

“Making Philadelphia the greenest city in America involves infrastructure changes and creating healthy, sustainable spaces, and it is also about creating opportunities to educate our children about the environment so that they are prepared to care for it in the future,” said Mayor Nutter.

Today Mayor Michael A. Nutter, City Council President Darrell L. Clarke, Deputy Mayor/Department of Parks and Recreation Commissioner Michael DiBerardinis and The Trust for Public Land hosted a ribbon-cutting to celebrate the completion of a new green playground at the Hank Gathers Recreation Center in the Strawberry Mansion neighborhood of North Philadelphia.

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