Greenways

The Trust for Public Land announced today that it has received a $50,000 grant from Gulf Coast Community Foundation to help extend The Legacy Trail into downtown Sarasota.

From the door of her apartment, Artyene Wilson can see the sparkling expanse of Lake Erie stretching away to the horizon. “You can’t beat the view,” she says. “On a sunny day our water is so beautiful and blue.”

Imagine a 30-plus-mile multiuse path along O‘ahu’s South Shore connecting Waikiki to West O‘ahu that would provide some 600,000 residents with easy access to the island's shorelines and green spaces; a path where hikers, bikers, walkers, and runners could exercise and connect with nature in and around Oʻahu’s urban coastal neighborhoods.

It’s 2 o’clock on a hot summer afternoon. You’re getting ready to meet some friends at the park for a game of basketball. Which t-shirt would you grab from the closet?

The Trust for Public Land’s report Connecting and Strengthening Communities: The Economic Benefits of Great Rivers Greenway demonstrates the success of the network of greenways in generating social and economic benefits.

The report includes three analyses that provide a benchmark of Great Rivers Greenway’s success in meeting its objective of generating social and economic benefits. The first analysis provides an in-depth look at the network of greenways and the communities served to identify areas in need of additional greenway access. The second analysis looks at the extent to which completed greenways enhance the value of the residential properties that are located in proximity to these assets. The third analysis provides information on how the network of greenways enhances quality of life, attracts employees and employers, and improves economic opportunity.

The fact sheet summary highlights the three analyses that benchmark Great Rivers Greenway's accomplishments. 

 

Protecting land brings all kinds of people together—in our work across the country, we’ve seen creative collaborations between everyone from hikers and birders to utility districts and railroads. But there’s one type of conservationist you might find... Read more

Can you believe it’s only been a year since the opening of The 606?

The latest addition to Chattanooga's greenway system is by no means the longest we've completed.

The three-and-a-half-mile stretch of rusty train track in central Queens is being reconceived as the “QueensWay,” a would-be linear park for walkers and bicyclists in an area desperate for more parkland and, with the potential for art installations, performances and adjacent restaurants, a draw for tourists interested in sampling the famously diverse borough.

Architectural renderings allow us to peer into the future of our beloved city without a crystal ball. New York City has some big changes coming, and here are 17 future attractions that will transform the Big Apple as we know it.

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