Clean water protection

The Trust for Public Land recently coordinated a transaction of forested land near the Dosewallips River in partnership with the Navy, the Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission and Pope Resources.

Pisgah National Forest, which covers more than a half-million acres of heavily forested mountains, mile-high peaks, waterfalls, streams and rivers along the eastern edge of the mountains of Western North Carolina, just added another 517 acres of important conservation land thanks to federal money from the Land and Water Conservation Fund.

A 517-acre block of land has been added to the Pisgah National Forest, The Trust for Public Land and the U.S. Forest Service announced today. The property is near Mulberry Creek in Caldwell County.

It’s not often that we get to participate in a project to restore a portion of our community to the way it was many years ago, but that is exactly what happened at the new Story Mill Community Park.

In a watershed victory for conservation advocates and city officials who saw the need to permanently protect Whitefish’s municipal water supply while preserving recreational access to a 3,000-acre tract of land, voters overwhelmingly approved a 1 percentage point resort tax increase that will help finance the purchase of a conservation easement in Haskill Basin.

Today The Trust for Public Land announced a significant purchase of land, which will soon result in the expansion of the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area.

For years, the community has fought plans to build a large subdivision by Arroyo Burro Creek. To ensure the property is permanently protected, The Trust for Public Land is working to acquire the site for the City of Santa Barbara and restore it as a park and wildlife area for everyone to enjoy.

In 2009, a 550-acre property known as Mosiers Knob, adjacent to the Delaware Water Gap, was approved for more than 200 residential units. We worked to have it protected as an addition to  the National Park Service.

“There is poop going into the East River,” the teacher says, sprinkling black specks onto a cutaway model consisting of buildings, streets, and sewer pipes. It is week three of design class at P.S. 15, the Roberto Clemente School, on Manhattan’s Lower East Side, and a group of third graders is participating in the New York City Playgrounds Program, which, led by the Trust for Public Land (TPL), transforms asphalt inner-city schoolyards into community parks.

The Trust for Public Land is working to protect the Double E Ranch in southwest New Mexico, an outdoor playground for hikers and rock climbers and unparalleled wildlife habitat for bighorn sheep, black bear, Coues white-tailed deer, and many migratory birds.

Pages: