Clean water protection

Sugarbush president Win Smith has challenged the Mad River Valley to match a grant of $10,000 to raise the final funds needed to complete the conservation of the 2,085-acre Dowsville Headwaters. The land will be added to Camel’s Hump State Park.

There are corners of Montana where it can seem like time stands still. In the hush of a deep forest or the chatter of a trout stream, the imagination wanders back to an era in the West when the woods were wild and deals were sealed with a handshake.

The Trust for Public Land, Green Diamond Resource Company and Washington State Department of Natural Resources today announced they have permanently protected 6,967 acres of working forest land in Mason County at the southwestern end of Puget Sound.

The Trust for Public Land, City of Whitefish, F.H. Stoltze Land & Lumber, and Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks today announced that they have recorded a conservation easement on 3,020 acres owned by F.H. Stoltze Land & Lumber Company in the Haskill Creek watershed east of Whitefish. Closing this deal means that the land will be permanently protected to support local timber jobs and important fish and wildlife habitat, while also providing the City of Whitefish with the majority of their water supply and the public with continued opportunities for close-to-home outdoor recreation.

The Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area in suburban Atlanta is growing by 47 acres, which will nearly complete an eight-mile corridor of conserved public land along the river, The Trust for Public Land and the National Park Service announced today.

The nonprofit Trust for Public Land will within days begin the process of reopening Astoria Hot Springs to the public as part of a 100-acre park.The natural hot springs are located 16 miles south of Jackson on the bank of the Snake River within property owned by New York-based real estate concern Northlight Trust.

The proposal to rebuild Astoria Hot Springs  has been widely supported in the community. A rezoning application recently approved by the Teton County commissioners paves the way for the historic springs to return, albeit in a different form.

A plan to bring a long-loved amenity back to Teton County is making headway through the county’s planning process. For 40 years Astoria Hot Springs offered spring-fed soaking, open space and concessions. In May 2014, the nonprofit Trust for Public Land announced a proposal to reopen Astoria as part of a 100-acre park that would remain available to the public in perpetuity.

For decades, residents and visitors to Jackson, Wyoming, enjoyed these natural mineral soaking pools on the banks of the Snake River for birthday parties, picnics, and camping trips. But in the late 1990s, the facility closed and the community lost access to one its most-loved recreation areas. Now, the Town of Jackson, designers, park planners, and community groups are working to protect the property from development and transform 100 acres along the Snake River into a unique park.

Since 2010, the Maunalua Fishpond Heritage Center has been stewarding the spring and the archaeological and cultural sites on the property. The Trust for Public Land is now working with the center to permanently protect the site so they can continue to maintain the spring and offer educational opportunities.

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