Historic sites

In the 1940s, McKee Jungle Gardens was one of Florida's most popular roadside attractions, hosting more than 100,000 tourists each year.

From the mid-1800s through the early 1900s, Sinkyone people were massacred and driven from their land, with some survivors joining neighboring tribes.

In late 2008, TPL worked with the Triangle Land Conservancy to purchase Riverwalk, permanently protected a 329-acre property at the juncture of the Neuse River and Marks Creek.

In March 2011, TPL protected 17 acres of privately-owned shoreline within the Lapakahi State Historical Park.

A 60-acre gem located in Lake Vermilion's Wolf Bay, Wolf Island is a place of legend and lore, with historical ties to both Native Americans and Voyageurs.

The Trust for Public Land helps municipalities and other local partners conserve farmland under pressure or directly threatened with development.

Since Colonial times, an expanse of land known as the Common Pasture, in Newbury and Newburyport has been continuously used for farming and pasturing livestock.

In May, 1864, Confederate troops under General Joseph E. Johnson dug fortifications into rolling hills in Resaca, Georgia, attempting to stall the Union Major General William T.

The oldest continually operating boat building business in the United States, Lowell's Boat Shop, in Amesbury, was founded in 1793.