Historic sites

The remains of the ancient fishing village of Kauleoli lie just south of Pu‘uhonua o Honaunau National Historic Park on the Kona Coast of Hawai‘i Island.

The Trust for Public Land is working to purchase Pu'ukua, to complete the permanent protection of this sacred landscape in Waimea Valley. Hi'ipaka LLC, a local nonprofit, will own and care for Pu'ukua, as it does the rest of the valley.

Aloha Kuamo‘o ‘Aina (AKA) and The Trust for Public Land announced today that they have successfully acquired the ancient Kuamo‘o battlefield and burial grounds on Hawai‘i Island south of Kona, 47 acres of makai land that is rich in history, cultural treasures, burial sites, and a portion of the Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail.

Since 2010, the Maunalua Fishpond Heritage Center has been stewarding the spring and the archaeological and cultural sites on the property. The Trust for Public Land is now working with the center to permanently protect the site so they can continue to maintain the spring and offer educational opportunities.

The Trust for Public Land is working with partners to protect the land from development and ensure that the area's natural beauty and cultural sites will be preserved for everyone to enjoy.

The Kona Coast on the island of Hawai'i is the site of the historic battle that led to the end of the traditional kapu religious system in the early 1800s. The Trust for Public Land worked with a local nonprofit organization, the landowner, and the community to preserve this special place for generations to come.

President Obama’s declaration protecting the Pullman Historic District as a national monument is a good way to protect an important piece of American history, The Trust for Public Land said today.

King’s Canyon, Sequoia, Yosemite—today, they’re among the most widely recognized parks in the world. But in the early 1900s, the first national parks were unfinished, untested, and protected only on paper.

The Ebenezer Creek site of a frantic and tragic moment of Civil War history has been protected as a new public park. On December 9, 1864 hundreds of freed slave refugees died trying to cross Ebenezer Creek to avoid confederate troops pursuing General William Tecumseh Sherman during the union Army’s “March to the Sea.” Public outcry over the deaths led President Abraham Lincoln to approve Sherman’s Special Field Orders No. 15 that were intended to redistribute to former slaves 400,000 acres of confiscated coastal property in 40-acre tracts. The order was revoked by President Andrew Johnson following Lincoln’s death.

Nearly a half-million visitors each year come to this park on Hawai'i Island to attend demonstrations of traditional Hawaiian arts and crafts, hike a historic trail to important archeological sites associated with the highest chiefs and priests, or just soak up the atmosphere of this sacred place.

Pages: