Community forests

In the Brainerd Lakes area, TPL led an effort to purchase a working forest conservation easement over 4,776 acres of prime forestland owned by the Potlatch Corporation. This land was vulnerable to the tremendous residential and commercial growth pressures... Read more

Contrary to its name, Dead Lake teems with life. At nearly 8,000 acres, it's the largest Natural Environmental Lake in Minnesota, supporting abundant fish, waterfowl, and other wildlife.

For generations, the private timberlands of Minnesota's Northwoods have supported jobs, provided wildlife habitat and clean water, offered recreation to local residents, and attracted millions of visitors each year.

In 2007, TPL worked with a fourth-generation family-owned business, Rajala Companies, in Grand Rapids to protect more than 1,600 acres of private forestland known as "Sugar Hills".

More than 5,700 acres of private forest bordering four miles of the Long Trail State Forest, the nation's oldest long-distance hiking trail, have been permanently protected, The Trust for Public Land (TPL) and the State of Vermont announced today.

At more than 3.3 million acres, the Gila National Forest in southwestern New Mexico is the sixth largest national forest in the Lower 48. It’s also an important habitat in arid New Mexico, providing a healthy watershed home to many of the state’s native... Read more

In the 1940s, tens of thousands of acres of forest in Louisiana's Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley were clear cut and converted to cotton and other crops.

The serenity of this pristine mountain lake captured the attention of Charles Lindbergh after his famous solo trans-Atlantic flight of 1927.

Totally surrounded by the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest, this 80-acre Bayfield County property was one of the few remaining privately held lands within the national forest. This property includes a mature stand of northern hardwood forest.

The Crown of the Continent represents the largest intact ecosystem in the United Sates: the list of plant and animal species living here has remained unchanged since the time of the Lewis and Clark expedition.