Coastal lands

In early 2011, The Trust for Public Land conserved a large, forested wetlands property along a half-mile of Ayres Creek, a popular canoeing and kayaking destination. The property, a priority for local conservation efforts, is within the 4,000-acre Holly Grove Swamp area, and will be the first large wooded area available for public access in northern Worcester County.

TPL worked with the town of New Castle to protect the 60-acre Broad Dyke property along the Delaware River, which includes significant tidal and freshwater wetlands as well as forested uplands.

One of the last large undeveloped tracts on the west end of Galveston Island, the 300 acres of prairie and marsh at McAllis Point offer critical habitat for birds, including sandhill cranes, which nest there from November to March.

Situated on the southwestern tip of Puerto Rico, the Cabo Rojo Salt Flat property has been documented as the most important site in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands for migratory shorebirds.

In 2003, TPL joined
local groups, including the Greenpoint Waterfront Association for
Parks & Planning, to conduct open space planning, and produce a greenprint for New York's East River.

In Los Angeles County, where 98 percent of coastal wetlands have been filled in and developed, conservationists worked for three decades to protect the last remnant of the historic Ballona Wetlands near the Los Angeles International Airport.

The Trust for Public Land preserves our coastal lands and waters, providing public access and ensuring the long-term health of our estuaries, beaches and bays that our tourism and fishing industries need to thrive.

Timber Point was one of the last large, privately-owned properties along the 50-mile coastline between Cape Elizabeth and Kittery.

The Isinglass River flows through one of the fastest-growing regions of New Hampshire. It is a prized recreation spot for local anglers and boating enthusiasts, as well as a critical source of drinking water for many towns.

Since establishing our Washington office in 1975, The Trust for Public Land has become a conservation leader in Puget Sound, preserving natural forest lands that capture and filter fresh water supplies, and protecting the shoreline of our unique inland sea

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