Coastal lands

In the fall of 2015, The Trust for Public Land purchased the Preserve's 688 acres from the family that has owned the land for most of the 20th century. The newly established Kashia Coastal Preserve restores coastal access to the Kashia, protects important cultural sites, and provides a place to connect present and future generations of the Kashia with their heritage

The Trust for Public Land is working with partners to protect the land from development and ensure that the area's natural beauty and cultural sites will be preserved for everyone to enjoy.

The Kona Coast on the island of Hawai'i is the site of the historic battle that led to the end of the traditional kapu religious system in the early 1800s. The Trust for Public Land worked with a local nonprofit organization, the landowner, and the community to preserve this special place for generations to come.

The Trust for Public Land today announced that the last large unprotected coastal forest between New York and Boston, a 1,000 acre parcel known as The Preserve, will be permanently protected, instead of being developed with houses and a golf course. The land is now owned by Connecticut, the town of Old Saybrook and Essex Land Trust.

Ever heard of the Antiquities Act? It may sound like something straight out of a Mummy sequel, but it's actually the century-old law that grants the U.S.

Stretching five miles from Kawela Bay to Kahuku Point, the land surrounding the Turtle Bay Resort embraces one of the last undeveloped wild shorelines on O'ahu.

We are working to protect the Rosemma Wetlands in New Jersey's Long Beach Township, a scenic seascape that is also a critical storm buffer and home to many species, some which are threatened or endangered in the state.

One of the largest undeveloped Mississippi River properties in the Twin Cities region has been protected as a new conservation area, the City of Elk River and The Trust for Public Land announced today.

To help cities better manage stormwater, The Trust for Public Land incorporates green infrastructure solutions into many of our parks and playgrounds.

The Ebenezer Creek site of a frantic and tragic moment of Civil War history has been protected as a new public park. On December 9, 1864 hundreds of freed slave refugees died trying to cross Ebenezer Creek to avoid confederate troops pursuing General William Tecumseh Sherman during the union Army’s “March to the Sea.” Public outcry over the deaths led President Abraham Lincoln to approve Sherman’s Special Field Orders No. 15 that were intended to redistribute to former slaves 400,000 acres of confiscated coastal property in 40-acre tracts. The order was revoked by President Andrew Johnson following Lincoln’s death.

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