Climate change

The latest addition to Chattanooga's greenway system is by no means the longest we've completed.

In some regards, Sandusky just can’t compete with most metropolises. But the small city just pulled off a major upset, snagging a new and rare research opportunity many other waterfront communities — such as Chicago, Milwaukee, Detroit, Buffalo and others — also wanted.

Through 2017 The Trust for Public Land will work with Cleveland and Sandusky communities to plan for investment in park and public spaces that both address climate challenges, human health, and other benefits. In Cleveland, for example, less than 25 percent of residents are within a 10-minute walk to a park. Improving stormwater management through potential park investments, while improving access to parks, is a win-win.

We are applying our Climate-Smart Cities strategy throughout metro Boston to create a stronger, safer, and more climate-resilient Massachusetts.

It doesn't take a diplomat to recognize that it's rare for 195 countries to agree on anything, much less on a subject as thorny as carbon emissions. So the outcome of the Paris Climate Change Conference—an agreement to try and hold warming to 2°C or less—... Read more

When Hurricane Katrina tore through New Orleans in August 2005, it left 90 percent of historic City Park—an area larger than New York's Central Park—underwater.

Together, we can turn the Eastside Rail Corridor into a trail that serves walkers, bikers, families and promotes the economic, social, and environmental vitality of our region

The Trust for Public Land today said it supports the call by California Governor Jerry Brown for the state to cut its greenhouse gas emissions by 40 percent by 2030, and said natural infrastructure can play a major role in achieving those goals.

The Trust for Public Land announced today that it will provide $300,000 to help states create new tools to help communities aid the fight against climate change by trapping more carbon in forests.

We are working to protect the Rosemma Wetlands in New Jersey's Long Beach Township, a scenic seascape that is also a critical storm buffer and home to many species, some which are threatened or endangered in the state.

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