In this paper, we survey the most recent peer-reviewed literature on green infrastructure to assess its demonstrated effectiveness in moderating urban temperatures and, as a result, lessening energy consumption and associated greenhouse gas emissions.

Quantifying the Greenhouse Gas Benefits of Urban Parks report outlines the greenhouse gas benefits of adding green space to an urban area and introduces methodologies for estimating potential greenhouse gas reductions.

We are applying our Climate-Smart Cities strategy throughout metro Boston to create a stronger, safer, and more climate-resilient Massachusetts.

This report focuses on the opportunity presented by federally-mandated stormwater management requirements. Green Infrastructure (GI) is a decentralized and potentially cost-effective alternative management strategy that can reduce stormwater at its source, while simultaneously providing communities with a number of other valuable urban ecosystem services – direct and indirect benefits that people can derive from urban ecosystems.

The Trust for Public Land’s Climate-Smart Cities program has been working with cities to plan comprehensive active transportation networks that allow people to reach destinations by bike and foot safely and conveniently. This report, developed in partnership with ICF International, describes our methodology for assessing the environmental, public health, and economic benefits of active transportation investments.

The Trust for Public Land, buildingcommunityWORKSHOP, and The Texas Trees Foundation today presented the initial results of their Smart Growth for Dallas partnership to the City of Dallas Park and Recreation Board.

It’s 2 o’clock on a hot summer afternoon. You’re getting ready to meet some friends at the park for a game of basketball. Which t-shirt would you grab from the closet?

The latest addition to Chattanooga's greenway system is by no means the longest we've completed.

Super-slides and wave pools? Try bioswales and rain gardens. Across the country, city parks are doing double-duty to help control stormwater—and infrastructure’s rarely looked so good.