City parks

Hanging out on abandoned railroad tracks, usually an un-civic and unhelpful activity, can be transformed into a good thing with just two words: “linear park.”

A ribbon-cutting celebration was held today for a new passive recreational park located along the waterfront of Staten Island's north shore on the Kill Van Kull Watershed—created through a partnership of The Trust for Public Land, The Port Authority of New... Read more

From San Francisco's first public park, Portsmouth Square, to the unparalleled experience of Golden Gate Park, the city's vast legacy of diverse parks has great economic value: an impressive $959 million a year.

After a year of meetings with residents of Queens, The Trust for Public Land and the Friends of the QueensWay, a grassroots community organization with over 3,000 supporters from Central and Southern Queens, today... Read more

After meeting the pups of Potso, we can't get enough of the dog-park scene. We went off-leash at Alamo Square in San Francisco to ask locals what makes their park special—and found the human and canine community out... Read more

New York City and The Trust for Public Land today continued a unique partnership to build up to 40 new school playgrounds that will include green infrastructure to capture stormwater when it rains, thereby easing pressure on the City's sewer system and... Read more

Today The City of New York and The Trust for Public Land celebrated the completion of their sixth green infrastructure playground—the first to open in Queens—with a ribbon-cutting ceremony at J.H.S. 157 Halsey Jr. High School.

The Trust for Public... Read more

The three-and-a-half-mile stretch of rusty train track in central Queens is being reconceived as the “QueensWay,” a would-be linear park for walkers and bicyclists in an area desperate for more parkland and, with the potential for art installations,... Read more

Architectural renderings allow us to peer into the future of our beloved city without a crystal ball. New York City has some big changes coming, and here are 17 future attractions that will transform the Big Apple as we know it.

There are plenty of large-scale projects in the pipeline that on paper may seem far-fetched, but which could ultimately transform and improve the Big Apple.

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