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Santa Barbara in 1898

Before anyone hyped kombucha or acai berry smoothies, a simpler drink was all the rage among health nuts: mineral water, drawn from natural springs. In the late 1800s and early 1900s, American companies touted the restorative power of spring water to treat ailments from rheumatism to bronchitis...

The National Park Service is marking its hundredth birthday with a special gift to kids. In a bid to get more students and families outdoors, the “Every Kid in a Park” initiative is providing free entrance passes to every fourth grader in the country throughout the 2015-2016 school year.

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Denali

North America's highest peak rises 20,310 feet above forests of spruce and aspen, a snow-shrouded behemoth that has always defied description. Trying his best in 1906, naturalist Charles Sheldon said that nothing he wrote "could convey any suggestion of it"—perhaps the reason that the native...

City Park, New Orleans

When Hurricane Katrina tore through New Orleans in August 2005, it left 90 percent of historic City Park—an area larger than New York's Central Park—underwater. It was a heavy blow to an urban oasis that had served millions of people every year: locals and visitors who came to play sports,...

The Trust for Public Land met Donna Kirkland at a community meeting back in 1996—she was full of big ideas, and we knew right away that we wanted her on our team. Today, she runs our Parks for People program in Newark, where she's earned a...

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